Monday, May 7, 2012

It's a Keeper!

"Keep or go?", and I hold up the next item.  "Go"
"Keep or go?", and I hold up the next item.  "Well....I used to like it...but it has a stain...Go!"
"Keep or Go?", and I hold up the next item.  "KEEP!"

The keepers.  The things that we dear. They hold a moment or a feeling. Warm and fuzzy.  And there is nothing wrong with that, unless you are so surrounded that you can't move forward, or you're filling rooms until they no longer function.

But the keepers, if they truly are, require care to maintain them in the best condition.  Unfortunately, things often get put away quickly and with out care.  I hate the sad look I see on my clients faces when the keepers are brought out after being stored poorly.  They become broken, moldy, mildewed, or invaded by mice or other critters in their time travels. Here are some bad guys in keeper storage.

Cardboard boxes are not great for archiving in areas that are not climate controlled.  They wick moisture and offer no protection from mice and bugs. If I have some baby things of my children's that are dear to me, it wouldn't do to toss them it a cardboard box that may or not close well and toss it in a damp basement or attic. They are much better preserved in a plastic tote to save them from the dust and dampness.

Hangers with the stretchy foam (pictured here) is not designed for the long haul.  The foam ages poorly and eventually turns to a fine dust that becomes embedded in shoulders of the garment.

Rubber bands don't age well.  If you want to hold a bundle of cherished letters, use a ribbon.  Old rubber bands break, change texture and come to look like old worms on a sidewalk.

Paper clips and staples will rust given time.  If the stack of papers is important, use a folder or plastic report cover to keep it together and clean. Archival page protectors are great for recipes and other single page papers.

When you look at old memorabilia, it should make you smile after not seeing it for years. If it's a keeper, cherish it.